Achieving A Balance Of Nature And Nurture Is Easier Than You Think

work meetingThe eternal raging battle in business is reflective of the human beings that work in any given trade, industry, company and culture. As business leaders and owners, we hope to keep our fingers on the pulse of this struggle. What should be put forth as one in front of the other, nature or nurture? The heart would say that nature should be left to do its own thing, and in the world of business, that means allowing employees to be loose, creative, thinking and operating outside the box. However with that comes unknown risks, and you could face a rocky road ahead if you don’t get it right. The mind says nurture, and this translates in business to mean steering brilliant and innovative minds in the way we want. But, this can lead to a drop in ingenuity and can lead to not being able to find a way to trump your competitors. It’s important to realise that you don’t have to choose one over the other because both can coexist in your business, dependent on the techniques you employ to implement such mentalities.

Mentors for the go-getters

In every department in your business, there is a high chance that there is a couple or maybe just one worker that is consistently performing higher than the rest. This doesn’t automatically make them viable for a promotion, but they should be looked at more closely by their superiors. Those that have shown themselves to be great at their role at a junior level should have their skills and qualities assessed by the managers on the floor. It doesn’t matter if you work in an office, on a shop floor, factory, manufacturing, engineering or whatever the case might be, if you have employees that a solid, reliable, easily adaptable, produce high-quality work above and beyond of what you might require, they are more valuable to you than other staff members. One day they might be able to become a manager or team leader themselves. Order one of your managers to keep an eye on them, and slowly but surely nurture them into taking on a more responsible role. When doing so managers should be teaching them advanced techniques, whether it be about the software you use, how to delegate work and to whom as well as administrative responsibilities.

Voices of reason and knowledge  

As a small business, you’re going to be without the veterans that give so many large businesses the stability through rough times and growth spurts. With their knowledge and experience, these experts in their field are able to bring clarity, good judgement and a firm confidence into the boardroom. When you’re making decisions about expanding, rolling a new product, dealing with customers who want to see vast improvements and above all else choosing where funding and resources will be focused in the near future, the experience is invaluable. The world has changed from once upon a time when the only way you could hire such professionals was to become large businesses yourself which could take decades. Nowadays, however, people who have been in the trenches in their respective industries, seen almost everything and been a part of the major project can be hired by smaller businesses. Tailored advice and services are on hand if you contact Executive Recruiters who are committed to finding you an executive that would fit in with your business. Taking on this proposition with long-term success in mind, they look for leaders that have the skills to bring wisdom and good judgement into your boardroom where the crucial decisions are made. Never be afraid to receive a little nurturing yourself as those who have gone before can enlighten you on the trials and tribulations your business will face in the future.

Spontaneous creativity

Allowing your employees to be creative and offer suggestions to you, should be openly allowed. An easy way to make this happen is to have a segment in your weekly or monthly meetings, whereby you open the floor up to new ideas. Employees whether they’re managers, team leaders or junior staff can then honestly discuss new ways to do business, improvement to the tools you use in the offices, and quite happily any other form of advice. This is where you allow nature to take hold and give creative freedom to all your employees. You never know you might hear something in an update or ‘touching base’ style meeting with your low ranking employees, that you wouldn’t otherwise hear in your boardroom. Of course, the boardroom is where the superiors will debate the direction the business should take, but your other employees of different backgrounds, expertise, knowledge and potentially unusual way of looking at the business and industry, can provide you with a eureka moment.

Open-ended tasks

Giving your employees little windows where they are tasked to come up with solutions to the problems you encounter in business is like kindly giving innovation a home. Preferably you’ll be permit your staff to use their talent, education and imagination which will be released in the form of making a product or service better, especially during the development phase. This is where you’ll be testing a service or researching the pros and cons of a product you’re going to be bringing out on sale shortly. This should, of course, be communicated to them verbally and it’s recommended you also do so in written form on their task sheets, memos and or briefs. This inevitably will put them in a mental state that allows them to be naturally in their zone. The roles they have applied for and have now taken on, are their passion and what they are dedicating a portion of their life to, so release them from their bonds and set their individuality free.

Achieving a balance of nature and nurture in business is both wracked with enormous positives as well as unpredictable shortcomings. It’s natural to be wary and just take the easy road of setting an agenda and demanding your employees stick to it to a T. However by creating windows where they can invent solutions for daily problems you face, or for improvements to your business products and services; you could end up with a golden ticket.  

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